Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘through the eyes of a child’

As you may know already, Jamaica is pretty rugged. Life and weather arrive and disappear in the blink of an eye. Sometimes it’s rough. Sometimes it’s sad. And most of the time it’s not easy for children to grasp the concept of people, pets and plants going back to the earth. Or as we say in modern times, death.

Yesterday, we lost our cherished, little friend Mylo (pronounced My yo in our household as we are still working on annunciating l’s). Mylo was a survivor and lived through the tumultuous storms and floods of 2010. You may remember we were trapped (by rain) up in the hills and could not get to the GPs to protect them. We finally arrived home to find Mylo, shaking, hungry and terrified but her sister, Spot, and babies, weren’t as lucky. We nursed our beloved, last remaining Guinea Pig back to health and she’s been fine ever since. Until, just the other day when she became a little sluggish. Mylo died at home yesterday morning. The transition appeared peaceful. Ultimately, we think it was a heart attack.

Living in Jamaica, the children have become excellent grievers. Over the years, they have lost three grandparents, a couple of close aquaintances, fish, guinea pigs and their best friend, Cree Dawg. As parents we have discovered how crucial it is to provide opportunities for them to participate in the ritual and celebration of life and it’s passing. And so, we have fabricated several funerals.

Mylo’s celebration and burial was particularly heart warming. The children gathered flowers, made a heart and Iz (6) wrote out the head stone himself. We buried Mylo early in the day and returned after nap to decorate the grave site. Beautiful songs were sung. Memories laughed about and many, many, tears were shed. It almost broke my heart. Mylo was “such a pretty yady” (lady). “We yoved her so much.”

I think it’s important to help children through rites of passage. Allowing them to guide a ceremony for lost loved ones is empowering and healing. In some ways, I am sad that they have witnessed so much loss. At the same time, I realize how spiritually connected they are to life and nature. Gratitude.

Yesterday evening, as the babes headed outside for a sunset, ackee picking session, I overheard Izra say to his little sister,

“Miwi (meely), life comes and it passes. It’s alright, baby, that’s just how it goes.”

One Love, walk good, RIP Dear Mylo…

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

For the short version of this post skip to paragraph 4.

I do embrace the clean slated energy of Monday. Usually with zing. But, I must admit, sometimes Mondays, Tuesdays and frankly, any day of the week can grow unremarkably dull. The groceries, the bills, meal prep, laundry, domestic chores, home school, nap time, washing dishes, day in, day out, can leave a whole heap to be desired. I know, you know what I mean. It’s particularly challenging to lively up the dailies when faced with living in a rural area. I find myself missing the hustle and buzz of the big city, and most of all the chance to connect with dozens of conscious people, artists, musicians, baristas. Enlightened faces in general, make my day.

A few nights ago, my five year old held up his hand and proudly shared that “some people “call this baby finger, a pinky”. Hmmmmm, true. Did he just learn of this? This? From the boy who tells me he wants to build a house in Madagascar because it’s “highly populated with chameleons”. In a flash, I realized that there are a gazillion things I already know, that my babes are just learning or have yet to learn. I mean, simple things, like pinky fingers, hold huge fascination and W O W factor!

This is a reoccurring realization (if that’s even possible). It’s not that I forget the fact we can move mountains in home school and still be turning over pebbles in the daily. I think I just tuck it away for safe keeping. So I can be pleasantly surprised and deeply aware of fleeting glimpses of children’s light speed growth and comprehension. It’s precious and reminds me to look at every little thing with a spirit of discovery, exploration and excitement.

Here’s a tip, when things are feeling gray, dreary and repetitive to a point of nausea, peel your peepers a little wider. Look high, look low. Pretend you have the eyes and curiosity of an infant or even better, a toddler. Like things are still new. Enter Canon. My camera gives me toddler eyes. Through the lens, everything is new, challenging and often full of W O W factor!

Yesterday, for the weekly food shopping pilgrimage, I carried my camera in hand instead of in my purse. Generally, not a particularly exciting endeavor, going out for groceries, with my Canon in tow is way more intriguing. We stopped before we reached the main road so I could snap a few shots. See photo above. This flower and a multitude of other little things (that I don’t ordinarily take notice of) added up to a way better trip. Easy right? Just add camera!

How do you infuse the mundane with a little fun?

One Love, walk good, stoked for studio time today…

Read Full Post »