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Posts Tagged ‘healing’

It’s another gorgeous day in Jamaica. Things are looking up. For now, my computer is tolerating my digits punching the keys. It’s hard to say how long this will be the case. It’s pretty hard to type with your fingers crossed. My computer fritzing out effects my dailies greatly but is nanoscopic in the wake of the recent tragedy in Japan.

I haven’t had the words to even touch on the magnitude of damage following the recent earthquake/s and Tsunami. Today I am sending blue skies to the survivors. Blues skies, grace and healing.

I traveled to Japan as a three year old. I have never forgotten the kindness, grace and beauty I experienced in Japanese culture as a child. My few weeks there had a life long impact on my view of the world and folks in it.

More life and love for Japan today. May Japan be embraced by the powers of loving and positive intention.  May we hold a vessel for the hurt as well as the hope. May we hold an open heart, and open hands for the dreams. May we recognize and celebrate the arrival of the dreamers. We feel our brothers and sisters anguish from across the waters. May hope ignite your hearts when the storm has cleared.

I snapped this blue sky image while driving up our little lane the other day. I find it remarkably refreshing and simple. Keeping it on the positive isn’t always easy, especially when so much of the world is suffering. Perhaps, if we all meditate blue skies and the calm they offer, the state of current affairs will improve. It’s definitely worth a try. I can’t imagine that meditating blue skies and healing could make the situation worse.

One Love, walk good, keep your head to the sky…

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As you may know already, Jamaica is pretty rugged. Life and weather arrive and disappear in the blink of an eye. Sometimes it’s rough. Sometimes it’s sad. And most of the time it’s not easy for children to grasp the concept of people, pets and plants going back to the earth. Or as we say in modern times, death.

Yesterday, we lost our cherished, little friend Mylo (pronounced My yo in our household as we are still working on annunciating l’s). Mylo was a survivor and lived through the tumultuous storms and floods of 2010. You may remember we were trapped (by rain) up in the hills and could not get to the GPs to protect them. We finally arrived home to find Mylo, shaking, hungry and terrified but her sister, Spot, and babies, weren’t as lucky. We nursed our beloved, last remaining Guinea Pig back to health and she’s been fine ever since. Until, just the other day when she became a little sluggish. Mylo died at home yesterday morning. The transition appeared peaceful. Ultimately, we think it was a heart attack.

Living in Jamaica, the children have become excellent grievers. Over the years, they have lost three grandparents, a couple of close aquaintances, fish, guinea pigs and their best friend, Cree Dawg. As parents we have discovered how crucial it is to provide opportunities for them to participate in the ritual and celebration of life and it’s passing. And so, we have fabricated several funerals.

Mylo’s celebration and burial was particularly heart warming. The children gathered flowers, made a heart and Iz (6) wrote out the head stone himself. We buried Mylo early in the day and returned after nap to decorate the grave site. Beautiful songs were sung. Memories laughed about and many, many, tears were shed. It almost broke my heart. Mylo was “such a pretty yady” (lady). “We yoved her so much.”

I think it’s important to help children through rites of passage. Allowing them to guide a ceremony for lost loved ones is empowering and healing. In some ways, I am sad that they have witnessed so much loss. At the same time, I realize how spiritually connected they are to life and nature. Gratitude.

Yesterday evening, as the babes headed outside for a sunset, ackee picking session, I overheard Izra say to his little sister,

“Miwi (meely), life comes and it passes. It’s alright, baby, that’s just how it goes.”

One Love, walk good, RIP Dear Mylo…

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I am consistently delighted and surprised by the herbal medicine to be discovered in my own yard. If you belong to the baby boom generation your memories of this product may not be entirely pleasant. Apparently, “back in the day” it was used to induce regularity where there was none. My mother (a baby boomer and biologist) unearthed these seeds on a hike through our land last week.

Turns out, castor oil and particularly Jamaican, black castor oil, has been used for a variety of ailments and benefits for centuries. When picked, dried, opened, roasted, boiled, this seed produces a naturally wonderful oil good for a variety of internal and external uses. Since ancient Egyptian times this plant gained popularity for it’s smooth, cleansing effects on the skin and growth factor for hair. The leaves can be used as a bug repellent and the oil can chase away ringworm. Many a pregnant woman has swallowed this foul tasting stuff to induce labor. But did you know that it can also help the softening and dimnishing of wrinkles and stretch marks? Hmmmm talk about affordable alternatives to night cream.

Ultimately, a great cleanser for inside and out, Castor oil can also be used as a purgative. Given that it is Monday (again) I share this bit of herbal folklore and history in the hopes of inspiring a clean slate. Move out (purge) what isn’t working for you, invite in more of that which makes you smile. Inhale renewal, exhale the stale. Clean out the proverbial purse, kitchen drawer, glove compartment, “to do” file, etc.

Start anew. Embrace the possibility and inspiration of Manifest Monday.  You can be or do anything! Start something you love! Go on, rub yourself up in some good ol’ fashioned Castor oil. I promise you and your week will feel smoother and brighter!

Do one tiny thing to sanctify the arrival of a new week and watch the parade of possibility unfold before you…

One Love, walk good, Happy Monday!

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